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Item Absolutely Stunning Display Textile.

Tsutsugaki Textile Featuring Delightful Daikoku-sama & Ebisu-sama Images Along With Numerous Good Fortune Symbols. Likely a Wedding Present In Expectation Of A Prosperous Future.

Daikoku and Ebisu are Gods of Wealth and Commerce, and two Of The Japanese 7 Lucky Gods.
Age
Late 1800s to Early 1900s
Fabric Cotton & Silk Mix, Nice Soft Feel To This Textile. Unusual Dark Café Au Lait Base Color. See photos for patches of twill weaving.
Size
5.1 X 6.5 feet
155 X 198 cm
Medium-Heavy Weight, , Thick, Soft Fabric,
1.1 lb, 500 g
Condition
Fair to Good Condition
Has condition issues with numerous nicely done repairs by hand sewing and glues, as seen in photos. Repairs difficult to see on the front, but obvious on the back side.

Nonetheless Distinctly Marvelous Visual Appearance !

There are weak areas to this textile because of its silk content.

Delightfully Faded Colors.
Comments
Ebisu-sama and Daikoku-sama are inextricably woven into the fabric of Japanese culture. Thousands of shrines are dedicated to them, and their jovial images appear in countless businesses and homes.

Ebisu and Daikoku are the gods of bounty, protectors of food, and the patron deities of merchants. They are said to listen to the prayers of homemakers, traders and fishermen alike.

Daikoku is variously considered to be the god of wealth of the household, particularly the kitchen. He is recognized by his wide face, smile, and a flat black hat. He is often portrayed holding a golden mallet called an Uchide no kozuchi, otherwise known as a magic money mallet, and is associated with plentiful food.

Ebisu symbolizes business prosperity for merchants in all trades and success to people in any occupation. This deity of Buddhist origins is often associated with fishermen who call upon Ebisu to provide them with safe sailing and plentiful fishing. Ebisu is the only deity among the seven gods to have originated in Japan, whereas the other 6 have Chinese Buddhist origins.

For a lengthy discussion about these 2 Gods, see these links:
Daikoku and Ebisu




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