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Item E-Gasuri Ikebana Flower Bamboo Vase anda Flower Pattern Kasuri Cotton Futon Cover
Age
Early 1900s
Fabric 100% Cotton Homespun, Hand Loomed.

4 separate panels hand stitched together to make this complete textile.
Size
4.2 X 5.1 feet
128 X 156 cm

Thick fabric, medium-heavy weight
13 oz, 375 g
Condition
Very Good Condition
No Spots, No Holes, No Tears

We have washed & ironed this textile, it is ready to display as wall art or for use in your project.

Wonderful display textile. Very representative of Japanese folk art.
Comment Ikebana is a disciplined art form in which nature and humanity are brought together. Contrary to the idea of floral arrangement as a collection of particolored or multicolored arrangement of blooms, ikebana often emphasizes other areas of the plant, such as its stems and leaves, and draws emphasis toward shape, line, form. Though ikebana is a creative expression, it has certain rules governing its form. The artist's intention behind each arrangement is shown through a piece's color combinations, natural shapes, graceful lines, and the usually implied meaning of the arrangement.

Another aspect present in ikebana is its employment of minimalism. The container is a key element of the composition.

The spiritual aspect of ikebana is considered very important to its practitioners. Silence is a must during practices of ikebana. It is a time to appreciate things in nature that people often overlook because of their busy lives. One becomes more patient and tolerant of differences, not only in nature, but also in general. Ikebana can inspire one to identify with beauty in all art forms. This is also the time when one feels closeness to nature which provides relaxation for the mind, body, and soul.

The precise origin of Ikebana is unknown. The offering of flowers on the altar in honor of Buddha was part of worship. Ikebana evolved from the Buddhist practice of offering flowers to the spirits of the dead. The first classical styles of Ikebana started in the middle of the fifteenth century; the first students and teachers of Ikebana were Buddhist priests and members. As time passed, other schools emerged, styles changed, and Ikebana became a custom among the Japanese society.
The Japanese Botan


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